V. Survey results

SectionV

V. Results of General Survey.
A. State/County/Court Library Respondents.
B. Academic Library Respondents.

Questions 1-4 in the survey were for gathering contact information for followup purposes.

A. State/County/Court Library Respondents.

5. Has your library or institution conducted any projects to preserve legal information? Such projects may include, but are not limited to: deacidification, reformatting to microforms, reformatting to digital images, reprinting, restoration.

Yes 3 No 10
6. Does your library or institution produce and maintain born-digital legal information?

Yes 2 No 10

If “No”, skip to question 9.

7. Please describe born-digital legal information produced by your library or institution.

The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals have their opinions published on the internet (US Court of Appeals, 11th Circuit).

Annual Reports of the Montana Supreme Court, Misc. Reports of the Court Administrator of the Montana Supreme Court (State Law Library of Montana).

8. Are these born-digital legal materials archived?

Yes 2 No

If “Yes”, please describe how this is done.

The Circuit has them available back to 1994 (US Court of Appeals, 11th Circuit)

Stored offsite on Digital Linear Tape (State Law Library of Montana)

9. Does your library or institution download digital publications for the purpose of retaining them for on-demand use?

Yes 4 No 9

10. If the answer to question 9. is “Yes”, are they also archived?

Yes 2 No 2

If “Yes”, please describe how this is done.

Copied on Digital Linear Tape, stored offsite (State Law Library of Montana)

A few, very few, high demand items have been downloaded from primarily GPO databases. Once we have created the document, we tend to keep it. In most cases, we do not catalog the specific item. (San Bernardino County Law Library)

11. Additional comments or questions:

Please define “born-digital”. I presume it means information that originates in a digital format as opposed to print. We would like training in how to preserve digital publications and identify those that should be downloaded to ensure that they are available, since they are likely to be removed from the original site. (Rhode Island Dept. of Attorney General Law Library)

We have a collection of Georgia laws (not O.C.G.A.) from 1826 to present. Those books need to be preserved. I would love to attend a hands-on workshop on preservation so that I can make the necessary repairs. I am a new law librarian, and have not yet completed my M.L.S. degree. Thanks for doing this project. (Dougherty County Law Library)

The Law Library has only existed a little over 15 months and therefore has had little need to address the issue of archiving data. We are well aware of the likelihood for this to change in the future as we develop programs and materials that need to be preserved. Internal Library data that has been produced exists almost entirely in digital format and we are looking into ways to preserve the important documents, by either printing them for inclusion in a hard copy archive or accessing long-term electronic storage. (Douglas County Law Library)

I am a solo law librarian without the resources to participate in a preservation project but I wholeheartedly support the preservation work of other law libraries and actively promote it by talking to attorneys about the need for it. (Court of Appeals (California))

B. Academic Library Respondents.

5. Has your library or institution conducted any projects to preserve legal information? Such projects may include, but are not limited to: deacidification, reformatting to microforms, reformatting to digital images, reprinting, restoration.

Yes 16 No 12

6. Does your library or institution produce and maintain born-digital legal information?

Yes 6 No 22

If “No”, skip to question 9.
7. Please describe born-digital legal information produced by your library or institution.

Drafts of NCUSSL uniform and model acts, and text of final acts in four formats: html, Adobe pdf, WordPerfect, and ASCII text. (University of Pennsylvania)

Most law school official public documents are now in online format, accompanied by brief printed summary documents. The admissions bulletin, for example, has only appeared in full format online for the past two years. The most complete guide to our archival holdings and a history timeline for the law school appear on our web site with no printed counterpart. (University of Connecticut)

Cornell Law Library web site,  http://www.lawschool.cornell.edu/library/ contains unique databases (InSITE, microforms, Foreign and International Law Sources on the Internet: Annotated, etc.), library information, international mirror sites, research guides, and more. (Cornell)

Willamette Sports Law Journal (Willamette)

1. Faculty writings, both those that are in manuscript form before publication in print documents and those that are not published in print documents, are collected and deposited in a e-prints repository. 2. One of our law journals, Duke Law and Technology Review, is an electronic only publication. 3. Some internal library and law school newsletters are electronic only publications. (Duke)

e-Reserve files for courses in the curriculum, Digitizing early briefs of the Utah Sct and Ct of Appeals, Digitizing national constitutional and statutory religious freedom provisions. (BYU)

8. Are these born-digital legal materials archived?

Yes 4 No 1

If “Yes”, please describe how this is done.

They are saved on the law school server which is backed up every night. (Penn)

Archived twice each year to capture the content and style on an ongoing basis. (Cornell)

University computing, saved on off-site server. (Willamette)

3. Some of these items are printed and placed in the library archives. The other publications are only backed up on tape based on the general server policies. (Duke)

Early briefs (as part of entire brief collection) available thru Utah State Law Library (Sct). Religious freedom laws database is online at: http://religlaw.org. (BYU)

9. Does your library or institution download digital publications for the purpose of retaining them for on-demand use?

Yes 10 No 15

10. If the answer to question 9. is “Yes”, are they also archived?

Yes 4 No 6

If “Yes”, please describe how this is done.

Titles that are available only on the Web are printed out, sent to the bindery and cataloged/processed as additions to the collection. Many titles are government documents. (University of Colorado)

Downloading of digital publications is so far only on an occasional basis. (Rutgers)

“Archived” is a tricky question, the copies of state and federal documents that are downloaded are maintained on our law school server and regularly backed up as part of the regular system management. Do we have a migration/preservation plan for this data into the future? Not a firm one but the University is working to address this. (University of Maryland)

We download digital publications to print and bind (we’re preserving a print copy). We don’t archive them. (University of Washington)

A print copy is made, cataloged and added to the collection. (University of Illinois)

We recently hired a librarian to assist with these types of projects in the future. It is possible that we will begin a Yucca Mountain project in the next year. (UNLV)

Yes, but not in an organized fashion; just if something looks useful. (Yale)

We take decisions issued in electronic form (Word documents) by the Mayor’s Agent for Historic Preservation in Washington, D.C. and convert them to PDF and HTML format. We publish these documents on the Web for access by all. (They are published no where else). We will also reproduce them on acid-free paper for permanent retention. (Georgetown)

Once in a while we download a publication and bind it for our collection (SUNY-Buffalo)

11. Additional comments or questions:

The link to the University at Buffalo’s Preservation Report is: http://ublib.buffalo.edu/libraries/units/cts/preservation/

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